Cinna

Cinna

Cinna is a 5 year old Paso Fino cross gelding.  He came to rescue back in 2014, was trained and adopted, but was not a good fit for his inexperienced owner who failed to properly care for him. Cinna came back to Safe Harbor underweight, fearful, and had regressed in training.  Under the skilled hand of his Safe Harbor foster home, Cinna has been retrained again, and is once again taking a rider.  This is a lovely young gelding with a good head on his shoulders, but he is shy in nature, and apprehensive of strangers and large groups of people.  He prefers the human he has a bond with, and wants to develop a relationship. Cinna leads, loads, ties, and rides.  He stands for the farrier, and he trailers well.  He does require a high fat feed, and does require daily grain to maintain his weight.  This beautiful gelding is available for adoption with a $300 adoption fee.  Apply to adopt...

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Casy

Casy

Casy is a BLM Mustang who came to Safe Harbor through a White County cruelty investigation.  He is about 7 years old and 14.2hh. Casy was halter broke when he came to rescue, but otherwise untrained.  We entered him in to Rally for The Rescues Trainer’s Challenge, and he is competing with trainer Elysia Arnold. Elysia writes, “Casy has been progressing well. He’s pretty non-reactive and doesn’t mind other horses/dogs/kids running around while he’s working. If he isn’t sure about something, he will just stop and think it through instead of getting worked up. This guy is a great combo of level headed and curious and will definitely make a great partner for someone!” Casy is available for adoption at the culmination of the Rally Trainer’s Competition in September.  His adoption fee is $750 which includes all vetting while in rescue and 110 days of training!  Casy will need to be adopted to a home with board or other solid permanent fencing as his adoption must meet BLM Standards because he is an untitled Mustang.  The Bureau of Land Management will not approve electric...

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Dorian

Dorian

Breed: Tennessee Walking Horse Age: 17 Approx Size: 15.2HH Dorian is a gorgeous strawberry roan walking horse.  He currently gets nervous around new people and new situations.  He is working on ground work to build in trust in his relationships.  Though he has been ridden in the past, we have not yet started riding him in rescue as he needs work on foundational skills. Dorian’s temperament reminds us of horses we have had in the past that we know have been victims of soring, and we assume he has, too.  He runs to the back of his stall with fearful eye and tense muscles if you enter the stall with him.  He is improving at this with repetition and learning that he does not need to fear.  When handled he seems to be waiting for abuse to start, and expecting it.  He just tenses up in fear, but he does not act out or do anything naughty. On the flip side, if you just open his stall door and step to the side, he’ll calmly walk in, and he has a good education; he just needs the time to work through his fear to become a versatile horse.  Dorian’s fee is set at $300 to an appropriate home who will understand his background and help with his lifelong journey towards...

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Thursday Thoughts: What Is The Definition of Rescue?

Thursday Thoughts: What Is The Definition of Rescue?

In a prior Thursday Thoughts post, I wrote about how important micro-rescuers are to the broad world of rescue, and I’ll stand by that.  There is a however to follow, though.  Yesterday I stumbled across an article that turned by stomach that someone had posted.  It was very pro-slaughter and it used an example of an organization ill-equipped to help animals masquerading as a rescue as one of the author’s justifications for why he felt horse slaughter for human consumption should be re-funded in the United States.  We vehemently disagree with this position, and all of his supportive arguments.  They are narrow minded, and disparage true statistics on the state of equine welfare in the US today. The real data that is 100% at odds with the author’s propaganda is as follows:   According to numbers obtained from the California Livestock and Identification Bureau, since horse slaughter was banned in California horse theft has dropped by over 34%. Americans overwhelmingly support an end to horse slaughter for human consumption (recent polls from Kentucky, Texas and Utah respectively show that 82, 72 and 69 percent of those questioned oppose the practice). A recent national poll found that almost 70 percent of Americans support a federal ban. Since closure of the domestic plants in the earlier part of 2007 there has been no correlating rise in neglect and abuse cases.  Conversely, horse slaughter engenders indiscriminate breeding and neglect by providing a “dumping ground” for unscrupulous owners.  In the past ten years breeding has declined, and there has been a correlating decrease in neglect and abuse cases. The horse slaughter industry specifically seeks out healthy young animals as those are the horses with the highest profit margin when sold for meat weight.  Hundreds of horse rescue organizations operate around the country, and additional facilities are being established.  However, not every horse currently going to slaughter will need to be absorbed into the rescue community. ­ Many are marketable horses who will be sold to new owners.  Sick and elderly horses should be euthanized by a licensed veterinarian.  It is not the government’s responsibility to provide for the care of horses voluntarily given up by their owners. Horse slaughter, simply put is bad for horses and bad for our communities.  But what about the other argument this author made?  The argument that RESCUES ARE BAD.  Yes, in this one sided editorial he effectively said that rescues can’t be trusted because of one example he dug up of a poor organization, and a few dog/cat rescues that had adoption requirements that he felt were too rigorous (such as denying an adoption because the owner planned to walk his dog off leash [though he made...

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Ghost Pepper

Ghost Pepper

Age: 17 Breed: QH Type Pony Size: 13.3HH Ghost Pepper, or Pepper as she is called in her foster home came to rescue after pulling a disappearing act one too many times.   Her home had a light duty electric fence, and Pepper chose to just come and go as she pleased.  She does respect electric fence, and she is fine with other types of fencing, but portable type fencing is not enough for this free-thinker. Ghost Pepper is a gem with an experienced owner, but with a newbie to horses or push over she will get bossy, and will not be a fit.  She respects leadership, and she needs strong leadership for a successful relationship.  She is broke to ride, and she is refreshing on ground work in her trainer level home very quickly.  In fact, her trainer writes: “I love this Little horse! So far she has been a sweetheart, she loves people. She Is smart, she is caching on to ground work quick, she is eager to please too!” Ghost Pepper’s adoption fee is $400. Processed with VSCO with c6...

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Safe Harbor Aids Maury County Law Enforcement in Animal Cruelty Investigation

Safe Harbor Aids Maury County Law Enforcement in Animal Cruelty Investigation

Cottontown, TN June 9, 2017. For Immediate Release. On May 26th, 2017  Safe Harbor Equine and Livestock Sanctuary assisted the Maury County Sheriff’s office with the removal of over 30 goats and approximately 90 chickens from a Mt. Pleasant, TN home, approximately 1 hour South of Nashville. All of the approximately 120 animals were seized by Maury County Law Enforcement. Animals were kept in dilapidated cages, locked inside a dark unventilated barn, and in a paddock with inadequate food and water. An unknown number of deceased animal remains were found all over the property. The animals were suffering from a variety of illnesses, hoof rot and respiratory distress. Some of the animals were emaciated and suffering from malnutrition. 4 of the goats were dehydrated and in critical condition, and in need of immediate veterinary support. “The conditions on this farm were not fit for anything to survive. These animals have been suffering for an extended period of time and many of their herd mates did not survive.” said Sariah Hopkins, Safe Harbor’s Executive Director. Safe Harbor deployed to assist in this case with no prior notice or planning time. For the past two weeks the animals have been cared for by volunteers at the Animal Rescue Corps emergency shelter in Lebanon, Tennessee, Safe Harbor and Dr. Emily Dryden, DVM while Maury County Sheriff’s department completed their investigation. Today, all goats and chickens have transitioned to Safe Harbor foster farms pending the legal hearing for charges levied by Maury County against the owner. All vet and food costs are being funded through Safe Harbor Equine and Livestock Sanctuary, a 501(c)3 all volunteer non profit. Safe Harbor receives no government funding and serves as a public service charity. The costs to aid these animals have quickly climbed into the thousands, and they will remain on legal hold as evidence until after court proceedings. Please consider a life saving gift to aid these goats and...

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