Please Join Us Saturday, October 20 for our Fall Festival

Please Join Us Saturday, October 20 for our Fall Festival

Saturday, October 20 11:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. RAIN OR SHINE 3585 Highway 76, Cottontown We’re hosting our biggest event to date, spanning 3 of our foster farms! Start at our Training Center, where you’ll park and receive a wristband. 11:00 a.m. – FREE costume contest for the kids. Prizes will be awarded by age group. Activities at the Training Center will include: huge tack sale, equine demonstrations, adoptable animals, zero-gravity, buggy rides and pony rides. Tickets for buggy rides ($10) and pony rides ($5) will be available on site or online for purchase. A FREE SHUTTLE will transport you a short distance to two other fun-filled farms, with: Vendors – come prepared to do some Christmas shopping!, kids’ game zone ($1/game or $5 unlimited), kiss-the-cow booth (photos for $1), petting farm (free, feed for $1), BBQ lunch ($5/plate), bounce house, additional equine training demos, retired racehorses — and more! This is a family friendly event with free admission. Donations will be accepted and are appreciated. Vendor spots and event sponsorships are still available; please email us for more...

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The Elephant in the Room

The Elephant in the Room

There has been a lot of recent online chatter about ‘real’ rescues versus so-called rescues, and I wanted to address it using one of our available horses as an example. SnowFlow came to us a few months ago. She’d been a pet to an older gentleman who entered hospice care. We have a pretty good history on her as horses who come to us out of these situations go, and we tell her story on her profile page. Our dedicated foster farms have invested countless hours of time spent with her – catching, grooming, standing tied – making her a solid citizen. Then, we invested more than a thousand dollars in having her started under saddle by a professional; training which her current foster has continued. At around 12 years old, Snow is still a ‘green’ horse and needs an advanced rider. But, you can adopt Snow knowing that we are completely transparent about what she is – and what she is not. We are not looking for the first person who can pay her adoption fee; we are looking for the correct match for her. Snow came to us before she was in danger of going to an auction or ending up living out her life in a field with no farrier or veterinary care. When you adopt a horse from us, that horse has a lifetime safety net. This means that if your life changes, or if you can’t keep your Safe Harbor horse, the horse can come back to us.​ ​This is for the protection of the horse, so that they are never in danger of ending up in a bad situation; and for you, so that you don’t feel ‘stuck’ in a situation of not knowing how to rehome a horse safely or worrying that the home you choose may not work out. We are a 501C3 charity. This means that donations to us are tax-deductible. It also means that donors should expect a certain level of transparency. If anyone ever wants to see copies of a horse’s vet records, we are happy to disclose those. Each adoption closes with the adopter receiving their horse’s current Coggins, vaccination records, and any other veterinary work, such as teeth floating or chiropractic, that have been done while the horse was in our care. If the horse has special needs, not only do we disclose that up front, we walk the adopter through the horse’s routine care requirements and what the costs of those are likely to be. Finally, when you adopt a Safe Harbor horse, you are helping 2 horses. You are adopting a horse that will be your trail or show partner or companion, and you...

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Images of Hope Saturday, September 15

Images of Hope Saturday, September 15

Brittney Broadrick Photography will be hosting mini-sessions at the Safe Harbor Training Center on Saturday, September 15, from 8 a.m. until 6 p.m. These specially-priced sessions are available by appointment, and 75% of the proceeds will benefit Safe Harbor! Brittney has very generously donated the photo shoot of JoeBabe and she does beautiful work. If you’ve been wanting to have professional photographs made of your horse, don’t miss this special event! Additional information and appointments may be scheduled on Brittney’s...

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Neglected stray pony joins Harbor Herd

Neglected stray pony joins Harbor Herd

Lil Bae joined the Safe Harbor herd on July 10 after being found as a ‘stray’ by Metro (Nashville) Animal Care & Control in the late night hours of July 9. She was found wandering in the Goodlettsville area of Brick Church Pike. MACC is interested in talking with anyone who may know Bae’s origins or owners. Those with information can call 615-862-7928. Bae was examined by a veterinarian on the afternoon of July 10. She was found to be a BCS 1, suffering from extreme malnutrition. Her hooves are somewhat overgrown and her coat is in terrible shape due to her neglect. Bae was started on re-feeding protocol to begin her long return to health. She will be vaccinated once her body is stronger. At 20 years old, this pony is really just in her prime of life. Did she escape and leave others in her condition behind? Was she dumped off by someone hoping to avoid prosecution for her condition? We may never know her full story, but we know that she is safe now. We are accepting donations for Lil Bae’s recovery. If you would like to donate, you may do so here, or by mail at: Safe Harbor Equine & Livestock Sanctuary, PO Box 22, Cottontown, TN 37048. Thank you for your continued support of animals like Lil...

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Veterinary References and Why They Matter

Veterinary References and Why They Matter

When you apply to adopt a horse with us, we ask for a veterinary reference. You might wonder why this is important, especially if you’ve been blessed with healthy animals that haven’t required emergency care. Consider a friend of mine who rescued a neglected dog from an ad on Craigslist. She brought the dog home and immediately scheduled her spay surgery, deworming and vaccinations. She was able to have the dog seen within days because of her existing relationship with the veterinary clinic. If she applied to adopt an animal from us, she could provide this veterinarian as a reference even though she hasn’t previously owned horses. Consider also the importance of a veterinarian seeing your animals once a year, minimum. An annual exam will check baseline vitals for any abnormalities, can check teeth for sharp edges and float if needed, and vaccinate against diseases that would otherwise be deadly – such as tetanus, encephalitis, and rabies. For those who chose not to vaccinate, we recommend having a veterinarian check your animals’ titer levels to ensure they are, in fact, protected. The once per year examination also provides a fringe benefit – by maintaining that relationship with the person who you are going to need, sooner or later, for an emergency. Whether your horse cuts himself and needs stitches, comes up lame after a day of frolicking in the pasture, drops some weight and causes you concern, or shows signs of colic – you are going to want to have an established relationship with a veterinarian. I cannot imagine anything more terrifying than seeing my horse obviously needing veterinary attention and not knowing where to turn. Imagine having to Google “equine veterinarian in _(your town)_” and calling every number trying to find someone available to come to your farm RIGHT THAT MINUTE as you watch your horse suffer. So many of the horses that come through our care come from a previous life of very minimal care. The least we can do for them is to ensure their new life is better than their old life. This is why a positive reference from a veterinarian is important to us. This is why we ask. And, we are always very happy to provide recommendations and support to adopters who are new to...

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Equine Good Citizen

Equine Good Citizen

Equine Good Citizen.  If you follow our social media it’s a term you are sure to have seen.  If you have heard our executive director speak you will likely have heard her use the term as well. What does Equine Good Citizen mean?  We believe that not every horse has a future post rescue as a riding horse, but that every horse does have to be an equine good citizen to have a good future quality of life. An equine good citizen does not: Kick Bite Strike Pull on lead An equine good citizen does: Lead Load Stand Straight Tied or Cross Tied or Both Stands for the farrier Stands for blood draw/vaccinations Respects being in stall Picks up all feet for a handler with a basic knowledge of horses Is generally caught easily in field with or without an incentive such as a treat or food Regardless of the ability level, size, or age of a horse, we believe in Equine Good Citizen training.  Even our senior companion only horses will receive this level of knowledge at Safe Harbor.  If a horse is not yet an equine good citizen, then in good conscience we do not believe that the horse is at a level where he/she can be safely and developmentally owned by anyone other than a trainer.  As a horse owner, even if you don’t plan on riding your horse, we encourage you to have your horse trained to an equine good citizen level.    In the event of an emergency it can mean the difference of life or death for your horse.  On the day to day basis, these are the key building blocks of a good relationship.  If training your horse to an equine good citizen level is beyond your ability, just ask us, and we will gladly provide a referral to a great local trainer who you can hire to assist...

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