Goats – Various

Goats – Various

In May of 2017 Safe Harbor assisted Maury County Animal Control in the legal removal of over 120 animals of multiple species from a neglectful home. Among this group of animals is a herd of goats; primarily LaMancha/Myotonic Crosses.  Court for this case settled in July of 2017 and the herd is seeking a forever home.  We are not asking an adoption fee for any of the Maury County Goats, but there are some things you need to know before applying to adopt: This herd WAS exposed to CL+ Goats.  See below for what CL is. This herd HAS been quarantined for 60 days, and no members of the herd are showing active signs of CL. Many members of the herd have a chronic cough, which is being treated as Haemonchus contortus fluid buildup. The goats are being treated with extra-label anthelmintics under veterinary guidance. Above normal treatment with dewormers (anthelmintics) may be needed for an extended period of time post adoption. As a potential adopter, these are all important things to know.  Yes, these goats are gorgeous, friendly, and will make great pets.  But yes, they are special needs.  If you have goats of your own already we will require you to do independent research on CL and consult with your veterinarian to determine whether adding these goats to your herd is a risk you are willing to take.  We are happy to let your vet confer with our vet as well. If you do not have other goats and are willing to adopt knowing that you may need to talk to your vet regularly about deworming and related symptoms, then you are probably a perfect new family for these sweet ladies. We do adopt to pet homes only.  These goats may not be slaughtered and consumed and they may not be bred.  We recognize that this is a lot of information, but we always want to make sure adopters have full disclosure on any Safe Harbor adopted animal.  There is no adoption fee–if interested in adopting, please complete our adoption application today and select Maury Goats as your preferred animal. Read more about Haemonchus Contortus Here:...

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Do Safe Beginner Owners Exist?

Do Safe Beginner Owners Exist?

Beginner owners often reach out and ask us if we have beginner safe horses.  We often do.  As of this writing, Celie, GoGo, Buddy, and Cash are all on a list of horses that we consider to be beginner safe. But let’s turn the table.  Are you, as a beginner owner, safe for the horse? 2017 for us has been a year where we have had more adoption re-intakes than ever before. Either from adopters asking us to take their adopted horse (and sometimes other horses) back or we have found care to not meet our guidelines in our follow ups post adoption and have required a return to rescue. We take each of these circumstances very seriously. In review of each unique case, we have found that more than 90% of these returns have been directly tied to the adopter’s lack of experience. Horses are not puppies. They are not golf carts. Herds have dynamics and as humans it is our responsibility to seek training to learn to be a herd leader to safely interact with horses. Horses are 1200 pound prey animals who will always have herd members who exhibit flight tendencies, food dominance, and other behaviors when they don’t have the right handling and experienced leadership from their humans. Horses are as unique, if not more so than humans in their far reaching metabolic ranges that makes every horse’s nutritional needs different. Like a child jacked up on twinkies and Mountain Dew a horse WILL have side effects of too much sugar–behaviorally, founder, weight gain. This is why we have an approved feed list in rescue and we expect adopters to follow an appropriate feeding protocol for their adopted horse–which never includes sweet feed. We hold people responsible for learning these things. Good intentions do not equate to good horsemanship. We were all beginners once and we make the choices of what to devote time to learn. If basic horsemanship is not a priority then horse ownership also should not be a priority. Going forward, a Safe Harbor horse likely will not be an option for a new to horses owner who is not willing to spend time in a horsemanship learning environment prior to adoption. We love our adopters–but our first duty is to our horses. Their care before adoption and after is paramount and we are dedicated to assuring that from this day forward a lack of knowledge or sheer ignorance of the nature of horses does not create a perilous situation for our sweet babies. Have you thought through the details of horse ownership; If you are going to have more than one horse do you have a way to physically separate them...

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Storm

Storm

Breed: Morgan Age: 18 Height: 15.1HH Storm came to Safe Harbor when his owner could no longer afford to feed him.  He was underweight, and in need of weight gain rehab. Storm was formerly a show horse, and we were told he competed at the national level, all around including Hunter/Jumper. Storm is a very well bred registered Morgan, but we have no access to his registration and do not know his registered name. Storm does need to be on a low starch, high fat diet (he eats Nutrena SafeChoice Perform in rescue).  He does not maintain his weight on grass alone.  He does have current proof of negative coggins and is up to date on all vaccinations, routine deworming and hoof care.  He is well-trained and of course, broke to ride.  He has been ridden in rescue English and Western, including with a drone flying over his head which he was not bothered by.  He’s a fun horse, and he’ll be gorgeous back in the show ring.  A stellar find, and one you don’t want to miss. His adoption fee is $500....

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Learning from Patience

Learning from Patience

It was just three short months ago that we wrote an article called Duty, Honor and Responsibility–Caring For Your Senior Horse Til The End. Then, an advertisement shows up on Craigslist…Registered Quarter Horse, Free To A Good Home (Gallatin).  We’re sent the ad by those who follow us, not once, not twice, not three times, but four separate times, and in each time we let those who send it know we really aren’t in a position to help right now.  Our resources are limited. A fifth person asks.  This time, we decide we will at least try to find more of the story, and see if we can discover more about why this overly thin mare is being given away free.  Her name is Patience.  She was the owner’s childhood horse, and has been in her life her whole life.  Her owner is now in college, and the horse has suddenly lost weight due to chronic and explosive diarrhea.   This bowel issue has gone on for many weeks.  The horse did see the vet, but diagnostics cost over $400 with the vet the owner had used, and further treatment was declined. Her next step?  Free on Craigslist.  She went to a home in Kentucky from the Craigslist ad, and of course, her condition did not improve without treatment.  The “Good Home” this mare found was going to take her to auction tomorrow, July 6th. So, in spite of all of our reservations, and truly expecting the worst, our volunteer drove 3 hours round trip to bring Patience to Safe Harbor.  Our expectations were proven right when after a veterinary exam we found Patience has intestinal cancer and there was no path to save her.  At 1:08pm today, Patience was laid to rest to run free at the rainbow bridge. We simply can’t understand how the lifelong love of your life as a horse girl ended up free on Craigslist instead of humanely euthanized at home.  We want to believe it is just because people don’t understand how to work through the process of going through the final farewell with their horse.  Surely sending her off to a stranger and then to slaughter is more emotional and would make you lose far more sleep than being there to say goodbye–knowing the goodbye was peaceful and surrounded by love. Surely as horse owners, it is our duty to be there to the end for our horses.  For Patience, we were there for her at the end.  Her final moments were peaceful, but they almost were the most horrific end possible.  She was just one day away from a fate worse than death. Maybe you are nearing the time to make a...

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Maverick

Maverick

PENDING ADOPTION Maverick is a 16hh, 19 year old Tennessee Walking Horse.  He was once a ranch horse at Loretta Lynn’s ranch and is reported to be beginner broke.  Maverick came to rescue underweight and is not yet at a weight for us to put a training ride on him, so we are unable to confirm his training level at this time. MAVERICK IS IN REHAB.  He was diagnosed with canker when he came to rescue, and has gone through multiple treatments to resolve it.  He has another treatment scheduled, and we expect to be able to clear him from canker treatment soon. Maverick’s adoption fee is currently set at $300.  He is accepting applications now, but is not yet cleared for...

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Dozer

Dozer

PENDING ADOPTION 8 Year Old, 16.2hh Quarter/Draft Cross: Dozer was donated to Safe Harbor Equine and Livestock Sanctuary so his rehoming fee could help raise much needed funds to help horses in need–however, upon his arrival we found an undisclosed old injury that is performance limiting.  It is important to read this ENTIRE biography to understand Dozer’s story.  Please hold all questions until you have read to the very bottom of this detailed novel… The biography of Dozer from when he was a Ranch horse in Montana is as follows: Dozer is a solid broke ranch gelding. 16.2 hands, 1400lbs and takes a size 4 shoe. Rope anything you want, from the biggest bull he will hold it, to the littlest calf he will take care of it. We have rode him for many miles on the ranch and in the mountains in some very rough country. There isn’t any place he won’t go. He won’t hesitate in the thickest brush, he will push his way through and make a trail for you if he’s asked. Dozer is sure footed, he will cross water and downed timber with out a fuss. He is handy on his feet and will watch a cow, cut one out of the herd and he will stay with it. He is traffic safe. For a big horse he has tons of style and a pretty way of moving. He is soft in the bridle, lopes around quiet, know his leads, has a one handed neck rein, a pretty stop and turn around. He is great to handle his feet, good to bathe, and clip. You can load him in any trailer and he will back out. Dozer is current on worming and vaccinations. The owner who relinquished Dozer added the following information: He came from a ranch out west, and worked on obstacle course trail riding and around cattle.  We started the horse towards a career in becoming a field hunter so continued his trail riding and introduction to dogs and our routine around the barn.  He has been ridden English and Western in an easy snaffle bit at all times.  He is worked 4-6 times a week, our first five months consisted of light longeing in the ring then trail ride.  We turned to trainer A.B.L. who uses Buck Brannaman methods to solve some trust issues.  A typical training session with Dozer is 1 to 2 hours.  We consider him to be intermediate though he loves all people.  He’s gentle and quiet, but if he gets alarmed he is too big for a child to be around.  He is nervous with the farrier and requires encouragement and patience.  The previous owner said he...

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