Dozer

Dozer

PENDING ADOPTION 8 Year Old, 16.2hh Quarter/Draft Cross: Dozer was donated to Safe Harbor Equine and Livestock Sanctuary so his rehoming fee could help raise much needed funds to help horses in need–however, upon his arrival we found an undisclosed old injury that is performance limiting.  It is important to read this ENTIRE biography to understand Dozer’s story.  Please hold all questions until you have read to the very bottom of this detailed novel… The biography of Dozer from when he was a Ranch horse in Montana is as follows: Dozer is a solid broke ranch gelding. 16.2 hands, 1400lbs and takes a size 4 shoe. Rope anything you want, from the biggest bull he will hold it, to the littlest calf he will take care of it. We have rode him for many miles on the ranch and in the mountains in some very rough country. There isn’t any place he won’t go. He won’t hesitate in the thickest brush, he will push his way through and make a trail for you if he’s asked. Dozer is sure footed, he will cross water and downed timber with out a fuss. He is handy on his feet and will watch a cow, cut one out of the herd and he will stay with it. He is traffic safe. For a big horse he has tons of style and a pretty way of moving. He is soft in the bridle, lopes around quiet, know his leads, has a one handed neck rein, a pretty stop and turn around. He is great to handle his feet, good to bathe, and clip. You can load him in any trailer and he will back out. Dozer is current on worming and vaccinations. The owner who relinquished Dozer added the following information: He came from a ranch out west, and worked on obstacle course trail riding and around cattle.  We started the horse towards a career in becoming a field hunter so continued his trail riding and introduction to dogs and our routine around the barn.  He has been ridden English and Western in an easy snaffle bit at all times.  He is worked 4-6 times a week, our first five months consisted of light longeing in the ring then trail ride.  We turned to trainer A.B.L. who uses Buck Brannaman methods to solve some trust issues.  A typical training session with Dozer is 1 to 2 hours.  We consider him to be intermediate though he loves all people.  He’s gentle and quiet, but if he gets alarmed he is too big for a child to be around.  He is nervous with the farrier and requires encouragement and patience.  The previous owner said he...

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Thursday Thoughts: What Is The Definition of Rescue?

Thursday Thoughts: What Is The Definition of Rescue?

In a prior Thursday Thoughts post, I wrote about how important micro-rescuers are to the broad world of rescue, and I’ll stand by that.  There is a however to follow, though.  Yesterday I stumbled across an article that turned by stomach that someone had posted.  It was very pro-slaughter and it used an example of an organization ill-equipped to help animals masquerading as a rescue as one of the author’s justifications for why he felt horse slaughter for human consumption should be re-funded in the United States.  We vehemently disagree with this position, and all of his supportive arguments.  They are narrow minded, and disparage true statistics on the state of equine welfare in the US today. The real data that is 100% at odds with the author’s propaganda is as follows:   According to numbers obtained from the California Livestock and Identification Bureau, since horse slaughter was banned in California horse theft has dropped by over 34%. Americans overwhelmingly support an end to horse slaughter for human consumption (recent polls from Kentucky, Texas and Utah respectively show that 82, 72 and 69 percent of those questioned oppose the practice). A recent national poll found that almost 70 percent of Americans support a federal ban. Since closure of the domestic plants in the earlier part of 2007 there has been no correlating rise in neglect and abuse cases.  Conversely, horse slaughter engenders indiscriminate breeding and neglect by providing a “dumping ground” for unscrupulous owners.  In the past ten years breeding has declined, and there has been a correlating decrease in neglect and abuse cases. The horse slaughter industry specifically seeks out healthy young animals as those are the horses with the highest profit margin when sold for meat weight.  Hundreds of horse rescue organizations operate around the country, and additional facilities are being established.  However, not every horse currently going to slaughter will need to be absorbed into the rescue community. ­ Many are marketable horses who will be sold to new owners.  Sick and elderly horses should be euthanized by a licensed veterinarian.  It is not the government’s responsibility to provide for the care of horses voluntarily given up by their owners. Horse slaughter, simply put is bad for horses and bad for our communities.  But what about the other argument this author made?  The argument that RESCUES ARE BAD.  Yes, in this one sided editorial he effectively said that rescues can’t be trusted because of one example he dug up of a poor organization, and a few dog/cat rescues that had adoption requirements that he felt were too rigorous (such as denying an adoption because the owner planned to walk his dog off leash [though he made...

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Safe Harbor Aids Maury County Law Enforcement in Animal Cruelty Investigation

Safe Harbor Aids Maury County Law Enforcement in Animal Cruelty Investigation

Cottontown, TN June 9, 2017. For Immediate Release. On May 26th, 2017  Safe Harbor Equine and Livestock Sanctuary assisted the Maury County Sheriff’s office with the removal of over 30 goats and approximately 90 chickens from a Mt. Pleasant, TN home, approximately 1 hour South of Nashville. All of the approximately 120 animals were seized by Maury County Law Enforcement. Animals were kept in dilapidated cages, locked inside a dark unventilated barn, and in a paddock with inadequate food and water. An unknown number of deceased animal remains were found all over the property. The animals were suffering from a variety of illnesses, hoof rot and respiratory distress. Some of the animals were emaciated and suffering from malnutrition. 4 of the goats were dehydrated and in critical condition, and in need of immediate veterinary support. “The conditions on this farm were not fit for anything to survive. These animals have been suffering for an extended period of time and many of their herd mates did not survive.” said Sariah Hopkins, Safe Harbor’s Executive Director. Safe Harbor deployed to assist in this case with no prior notice or planning time. For the past two weeks the animals have been cared for by volunteers at the Animal Rescue Corps emergency shelter in Lebanon, Tennessee, Safe Harbor and Dr. Emily Dryden, DVM while Maury County Sheriff’s department completed their investigation. Today, all goats and chickens have transitioned to Safe Harbor foster farms pending the legal hearing for charges levied by Maury County against the owner. All vet and food costs are being funded through Safe Harbor Equine and Livestock Sanctuary, a 501(c)3 all volunteer non profit. Safe Harbor receives no government funding and serves as a public service charity. The costs to aid these animals have quickly climbed into the thousands, and they will remain on legal hold as evidence until after court proceedings. Please consider a life saving gift to aid these goats and...

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Hank

Hank

Hank’s story is not unusual.  He was in a home where he was the only standard donkey of his size, and he became lonely, bored, and started exhibiting less than perfect behavior. Hank was just trying to tell his humans that he needed a friend. In rescue, Hank is at a wonderful donkey foster farm, and is a true love to the kids in the home.  He is a gentleman, and loves quiet time, grooming, and sharing in lots of TLC.  His adoption fee is $250. Please remember, donkeys are herd animals and do best with their own kind!  We prefer a home that has at least one other standard donkey to be Hank’s friend. Please apply to adopt at...

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Thursday Thoughts – Reputation and Transparency

Thursday Thoughts – Reputation and Transparency

This week, on my personal Facebook page, I made a post asking individuals who are Facebook friends of mine to go on Yelp and leave a one star negative review of “Cure” restaurant in Philadelphia.  I’ve never been to Cure, but was sent an article in News of the Horse showing a menu from Cure that included Horse Tartar; minced raw horse meat.  I was and still am disgusted that this restaurant would find minced raw horse meat an upper class delicacy.  I stand by my request, and am glad that I let Cure hear my voice.  If in my life I ever stop raising my voice for the horses, then I will have given up. I was shocked to have two individuals who are on my friends list make confrontational comments about my request.  How can I post scripture one day and ask for negative reviews of a restaurant the next?  That’s an easy answer; both are standing up for what is morally right.  Religion aside though, the comment continued; “what if someone went out asking for negative reviews of Safe Harbor?”  How would I feel about that? Well, this may be a surprise, but it has happened before.  We’ve dealt with hate campaigns personally and organizationally.  We dealt with them not by confronting them, but by continuing to do exactly what we do and making those that would attack us look foolish; not intentionally but simply by continuing with our mission. Reputations have a funny way of proving themselves.  By that, am I saying we’re flawless?  No!  We have had bad adoptions, bad foster homes and even mis-read an appropriate match between human and horse before.  We’ve had volunteers feel we aren’t the right organization for them, and I’m sure, though unintentionally we’ve offended more than one person as we’ve gone about our work.  Life is a work in progress.  Safe Harbor is a work in progress, but we’re always striving to grow. Our stakes are high.  Let’s take Cinna for example.  Cinna came to Safe Harbor as one of our “wildlings”.  He worked with multiple trainers, and we were thrilled when his adoption came through.  He was spectacular.  He was featured on the Homes for Horses Coalition website and Facebook page! This is what Cinna looked like when he went to his adoptive home (photo courtesy of Shea Hutsenpiller Photography): One year post adoption we followed up and all seemed well.  2 years into his adoption we found we had a bad placement. Cinna looked terrible.  We could hardly believe that this photo was our Cinna: We brought him back.  We actually paid $150 to a commercial transporter to have him picked up urgently as we...

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Fiona

Fiona

Breed: Spotted Saddle Age: 12 Height 15.1HH Fiona is a gorgeous sorrel and white pinto with fantastic conformation.  She is 15hh+, and was adopted out as a beginner broke horse in December of 2015.  Her adoptive family have not ridden her, and have decided to return her to the rescue so she can find a forever home that will be the best fit for her. She loves to be groomed ! Fiona was re-evaluated and at his moment we feel a rider with some experience or confidence will be best for her.  She can toss her head and be a little fussy about leaving the vacation at the barn, but she does not buck or kick.  Fiona leads, loads, ties and stands for the farrier.  Her adoption fee is $500. To apply to adopt Fiona, please CLICK HERE. Safe Harbor Sanctuary is a 501(c)3 non profit rescue based in Middle Tennessee. Please visit our website for our adoption application, and to read more about us (including our adoption area) on our About Adopting FAQ....

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